Toronto’s Nuit Blanche 2018

“I can do that, all I need is an iPhone and a couple of lights,” this is what my friend says as we go through an interactive experience that flips our image as we walk through.

This is one of the many lack lustered experiences we were hunting down because it was Nuit Blanche and art was in the air. I remember years ago when they had proper funding and sponsorship the top tier artists and installations that flooded the streets of Toronto. Now, I feel there is a real gap in programming, curation and all around art. I had this same experience at Hamilton’s Supercrawl, where I was looking for some real art and was disappointed at what was presented.

So, how can we turn the tide and get some real high-quality art and design in our cities? We have to demand that we deserve better.

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Science and art: creating new immersive environments

What happens when art meets technology? Meet two companies using their specialties in photography and virtual reality to bring viewers inside the works of Damien Hirst and Zaha Hadid. Continue reading “Science and art: creating new immersive environments”

Sacred Spaces by Meredith Jay

Meredith Jay is a multidisciplinary artist who received a BFA in studio art from Concordia University. Located in Toronto, she makes sculptural installations that merge the digital and physical, as well as, sound, drawing, video and film. Through ritual and devotion Jay invokes and questions human behaviour and the collective memory.  Continue reading “Sacred Spaces by Meredith Jay”

Derek Jenkins: E6 Process

Derek Jenkins is a multidisciplinary artist based in Hamilton, ON. His practice is handmade, personal, and documentary, with an interest in labour and the domestic. In his current exhibition the E6 Process, he showcases the invisible labour beneath moving images. It is a work about work: the unseen beneath the seen, the heard beneath the unheard. It is subterranean. Continue reading “Derek Jenkins: E6 Process”

Guggenheim: Art, Design and Architecture

Several months ago, I finally got to experience the Guggenheim in New York City. It was definitely on my bucket lists of architectural structures. After studying its architecture and interior design in school and seeing this epic building in person, all the small details and stories about came rushing back to me. What really surprised me was that I got vertigo. I was having such a hard time finding my level because of the constant slant. I also went up the elevator straight to the top and worked my way down (the way it was designed to show artwork) and then realized half-way that I was supposed to work my way up from the bottom. Continue reading “Guggenheim: Art, Design and Architecture”

On Partial View by Laura Owen

On my recent trip to New York, I visited the newly designed Whitney Museum. Not really knowing how the collections were organized, I went to the top and decided to work my way down. There was a family in the elevator with me and they also had the same plan. I told them, I was going to do the same. Then, surprisingly, they asked me if I had seen another exhibit in New York that was getting rave reviews. I didn’t want to blow my cover that I was a visiting Canadian, and said, not yet. Continue reading “On Partial View by Laura Owen”

There’s no one refugee experience

Located on the second floor of the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Abedar Kamgari gathers an intimate crowd to give us a behind the scenes tour of her exhibition Journey West. We learn that this specific space is set up so a connection between the AGH’s collection and contemporary artists can emerge.

Continue reading “There’s no one refugee experience”

Latifa Echakhch – Cross Fade

In Echakhch’s process-based works, audiences are presented with the traces of an action. For instance, in Stoning (2010), the artist took bricks from a crumbling building – not a heritage site – and chiseled them into stones, recalling a method of punishment or execution. The tragedy that has befallen this place appears to have passed, and all that remains are the fragments of cast stones. Such gestures of abandonment and absence feature regularly throughout Echakhch’s oeuvre. Like Stoning, Cross Fade evokes the remains of an action that has already taken place. Echakhch’s wall painting of the sky appears to be falling apart. Fragments of the sky still exist intact on the upper sections of the walls, out of reach, reminding us of its beauty. However, large parts of the sky lie on the ground, creating a peculiar feeling that something beyond our control is either happening or has just happened.

Continue reading “Latifa Echakhch – Cross Fade”

Johnathas de Andrade – On Fishes, Horses and Man

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A fish dying in the arms of a man is what first strikes us upon entering Jonathas de Andrade’s exhibition. The film O peixe (The Fish) depicts in ten vignettes fishermen cradling their catch, the two species merged in a morbid embrace of sinew and scale. The scenes in the film, simultaneously brutal and tender, confront the viewer with the tension and pathos of the dying process, up until the fish takes its last breath. At that exact moment, the scene moves on to the next couple – man and fish – and the tension begins again, transforming the single action, through endless repetition, into a ritual. The predator, the human, is stronger than its prey, the animal. He dominates it, yet he devotes himself to the fish throughout the process of its passing.

Continue reading “Johnathas de Andrade – On Fishes, Horses and Man”