All posts tagged: Surveillance

Journalists confront surveillance

Wrestling with his fear about Googling the composition of a carbon dioxide bomb after hearing of a failed bombing at LAX, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung journalist, Peter Galison highlights one of the threats of mass surveillance to journalistic practice, “The knowledge that I might be walking into a security word search had been enough to make me hesitate.” Following Edward Snowden’s leaks outlining the capabilities of intelligence agencies around the world to monitor, track and collate private online communications this moment of hesitation before tackling a story has become a major concern to journalists globally. Ryan Gallagher of The Intercept states “self-censorship is never the only available option” he acknowledges that his practices have changed: “In the post-Snowden environment I definitely use encryption tools much more to communicate with people, mainly because more of my colleagues and contacts have now adopted these tools. It’s no longer a niche thing…the Snowden revelations were a big wake-up call for people.” (Via Index)

Digital media, privacy and consumer trust collide

The growth of digital media has been accompanied by increasing concern over consumer privacy. Is surveillance really the future for digital media? What are other viable business models? How are businesses managing consumers’ fears around data collection? To what extent do consumers care if their data is handled responsibly? In the digital age who should own consumer data? In the video highlights above, watch BBC News technology reporter Rory Cellan-Jones debate these crunch issues with panel: Emma Carr, director, Big Brother Watch Blake Cahill, global head of digital and social marketing, Philips Matt Adams, chief media officer, iProspect John Enser, partner, Olswang (Via The Guardian)

Canon Showcases Future of Surveillance

Image by Muhammad Zeeshan Samad Flickr CC Canon, the global leader in photographic and digital imaging solutions, today unveiled its line up of cutting-edge surveillance technology that will be showcased at INTERPOL World’s international debut in Singapore next week. Visitors will be able to experience Canon’s slate of surveillance solutions and technology, including: a preview of new network cameras slated for launch in the second half of 2015; a glimpse into Canon’s research into future surveillance technology for safer cities; and Canon’s existing offerings from the Cinema EOS and Network Video Surveillance range. Affirming Canon’s commitment to technology developments to help cities navigate an increasingly more complex future, Mr Kensaku Konishi, President and CEO of Canon Singapore Pte Ltd said: “INTERPOL World 2015 offers a unique opportunity for world leaders, policy makers and industry captains to discuss and chart new directions in the global security industries. Placed at the precipice of change, Asia is set to welcome even greater population movement into her cities – and in some countries, movement into smarter cities.” (Via Stockhouse)

Surveillance and Encryption

In January of this year, British Prime Minister David Cameron let it be known that he intended to dumb down encryption so that law enforcement could monitor all of the information streaming across the country. A direct attempt to capitalize on the Paris attacks. Today news about a police chief with Europol was advocating against encryption as it gives criminals a leg up. With the increase in data breaches it is no small wonder that some politicians have begun to start pressuring for increased surveillance. There is a need for law enforcement to have mechanisms in place to combat crime, it’s called laws. The problem here is that law enforcement and government have found that there are easier ways to get the information they want/need. The trust has been broken between law enforcement and the general public and future surveillance programs need to re-establish themselves with a thin veneer of legitimacy. (Via Forbes)

Surveillance and Encryption

In January of this year, British Prime Minister David Cameron let it be known that he intended to dumb down encryption so that law enforcement could monitor all of the information streaming across the country. A direct attempt to capitalize on the Paris attacks. Today news about a police chief with Europol was advocating against encryption as it gives criminals a leg up. With the increase in data breaches it is no small wonder that some politicians have begun to start pressuring for increased surveillance. There is a need for law enforcement to have mechanisms in place to combat crime, it’s called laws. The problem here is that law enforcement and government have found that there are easier ways to get the information they want/need. The trust has been broken between law enforcement and the general public and future surveillance programs need to re-establish themselves with a thin veneer of legitimacy. (Via Forbes)